Framed between the Petronas Towers and the highway, lays not only the most expensive piece of land in Kuala Lumpur, estimated to close to US$1.4 billion, but also a political symbol. Kampung Baru, with its neon lit food stalls and small timber houses stilting in the middle of banana trees gardens, embodies one of the last enclaves of Malay culture in Kuala Lumpur. Through this picture, I want to stage a seemingly paradoxical, and yet familiar situation to any contemporary metropolis. The confrontation of the generic and the specific, raises one of the main challenges of the post-global city, which is not about countering an already consummated process of globalization but rather about cultivating the notion of urban identity anew. Standing on the global ground and its promises of access to information, education and connectivity, without becoming generic; and thriving on the primary richness of the local without falling into the steadiness of romanticized clichés, the city must reinvent itself. In the same way we stood on the legacy of industrialization and the power of electricity to build up the city of the twentieth century, the time has come to think about what the legacy of globalization could be, and how information technology can help us master this generic condition.

Framed between the Petronas Towers and the highway, lays not only the most expensive piece of land in Kuala Lumpur, estimated to close to US$1.4 billion, but also a political symbol. Kampung Baru, with its neon lit food stalls and small timber houses stilting in the middle of banana trees gardens, embodies one of the last enclaves of Malay culture in Kuala Lumpur. Through this picture, I want to stage a seemingly paradoxical, and yet familiar situation to any contemporary metropolis. The confrontation of the generic and the specific, raises one of the main challenges of the post-global city, which is not about countering an already consummated process of globalization but rather about cultivating the notion of urban identity anew. Standing on the global ground and its promises of access to information, education and connectivity, without becoming generic; and thriving on the primary richness of the local without falling into the steadiness of romanticized clichés, the city must reinvent itself. In the same way we stood on the legacy of industrialization and the power of electricity to build up the city of the twentieth century, the time has come to think about what the legacy of globalization could be, and how information technology can help us master this generic condition.

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