pre-specific :  (Please reference if used, author: Diana Alvarez-Marin)  Topological representation of the typological work of B&H Becher, where situations of proximity represent highest similarity between elements (or bodies). Look carefully at the states of in-betweetnness, transition or indeterminacy, this is what the 21c is about.   we will not define a thing by its form, nor by its organs and functions, nor as a substance or a subject. Borrowing terms from the Middle Ages, or from geography, we will define it by longitude and latitude. A body can be anything: it can be an animal, a body of sounds, a mind or an idea; it can be a linguistic corpus, a social body, a collectivity. We call longitude of a body the set of relations of speed and slowness, of motion and rest, between particles that compose it from this point of view, that is between unformed elements. We call latitude the set of affects that occupy a body at each moment, that is, the intensive states of an anonymous force (for existing, capacity for being affected). In this way we construct the map of a body. The longitudes and latitudes together constitute Nature, the plane of immanence or consistency, which is always variable and is constantly being altered, composed and recomposed, by individuals and collectivities. (Deleuze, 1970, 127–8)

pre-specific:

(Please reference if used, author: Diana Alvarez-Marin)

Topological representation of the typological work of B&H Becher, where situations of proximity represent highest similarity between elements (or bodies). Look carefully at the states of in-betweetnness, transition or indeterminacy, this is what the 21c is about.

we will not define a thing by its form, nor by its organs and functions, nor as a substance or a subject. Borrowing terms from the Middle Ages, or from geography, we will define it by longitude and latitude. A body can be anything: it can be an animal, a body of sounds, a mind or an idea; it can be a linguistic corpus, a social body, a collectivity. We call longitude of a body the set of relations of speed and slowness, of motion and rest, between particles that compose it from this point of view, that is between unformed elements. We call latitude the set of affects that occupy a body at each moment, that is, the intensive states of an anonymous force (for existing, capacity for being affected). In this way we construct the map of a body. The longitudes and latitudes together constitute Nature, the plane of immanence or consistency, which is always variable and is constantly being altered, composed and recomposed, by individuals and collectivities. (Deleuze, 1970, 127–8)

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